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VYNCA AND DELAWARE HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORK PARTNER TO IMPLEMENT END-OF-LIFE MEDICAL ORDERS REGISTRY

By 08/01/2017 November 3rd, 2019 No Comments

ALO ALTO, Calif. & DOVER, Del.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Vynca, provider of sustainable advance care planning solutions, and Delaware Health Information Network (DHIN), the nation’s first statewide health information exchange, have established a partnership to facilitate the capture, storage and sharing of end-of-life medical orders across the care continuum.

Vynca offers a comprehensive software solution to capture, store, and access medical orders for Scope of Treatment forms, (e.g. POLST, MOLST) which are vital in ensuring that patients’ end-of-life wishes are met. The organizations will collaborate to create an electronic registry that provides a single source of advance care planning documentation instantly accessible online to authorized healthcare providers in any care setting. Work on the project commenced earlier this month, and the registry is expected to be operational by the end of the year.

“We are excited to support DHIN and its commitment to helping providers in Delaware to honor patients’ end-of-life choices,” said Maria Siambekos, Chief Executive Officer of Vynca. “The impact on patients and families when their wishes aren’t met can be devastating. We are hearing from an increasing number of healthcare organizations that this is a critical and high-priority issue. Vynca’s Advance Care Planning technology solution is flexible to support healthcare organizations across the care continuum to meet the needs of their patients at such an important time.”

End-of-life medical orders allow people with serious, life-limiting illnesses to document their care preferences. However, the lack of infrastructure to support and sustain an electronic registry can make it difficult for providers to find and access patients’ documents, especially during emergencies. In addition, patients’ end-of-life wishes are accurately documented only about 30 percent of the time,1 and about 25 percent of paper forms have an avoidable error that renders them unusable.2

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